Solar Week - Ask a Question



Come here during Solar Week (next one: March 22-26, 2021) to interact. To post a question, click on your area of interest from the topics below, and then click on the "Ask New Question" button. Or EMAIL or tweet or plant in Answer Garden your question about the Sun or life as a scientist to us -- and watch for it to appear here.  You can also visit our FAQs (frequently asked questions). In between Solar Weeks in October and March, you can view all the archives here.

PrevPrev Go to previous topic
NextNext Go to next topic
Last Post 20 Oct 2008 01:53 PM by  Pat Reiff
Solar Flares
 2 Replies
Sort:
You are not authorized to post a reply.
Author Messages

Anonymous





Posts:


--
20 Oct 2008 01:36 AM
    I am interested in knowing more about solar eclipses. Do solar flares occur during solar or lunar ecipses?

    Harry Larimer
    Tags: eclipse, prominence, hydrogen, solar flare, CME

    Terry Kucera



    Basic Member


    Posts:328
    Basic Member


    --
    20 Oct 2008 10:31 AM

    Hi Harry,

    They can in theory, but total solar eclipses last only a few minutes, so the chance of a flare occuring on the limb of the Sun during that time is not so big. Maybe someone has seen one, though. It has been suggested that a 1800s drawing of a total eclipse (see below) shows a coronal Mass Ejection (CME). Those would be easier to see during an eclipse - they are much larger in extent than flares - but you would still need to be lucky.

    Total solar eclipse drawings thought to show a CME: http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/2006/lo...rstcme.php

    Terry


    Pat Reiff



    New Member


    Posts:83
    New Member


    --
    20 Oct 2008 01:53 PM
    Sometimes people call the red extensions at the edge of the eclipsed sun (peeking out from behind the moon) as "flares" but they are really just prominences, material flung out from the Sun. The prominences are red because they contain a lot of Hydrogen. You can see some great eclipse pictures from the China eclipse that has prominences near the "3 o'clock" position at: http://www.eclipsetours.com/cresults.html You can see prominences any day using a Hydrogen-alpha filter. You can see today's h-alpha image by going to http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/spaceweather/ and choosing "H-Alpha Full Disk ... from Kanelhohe" but if the Sun is really quiet, like now, you won't see many prominences.
    You are not authorized to post a reply.


    Twitter Feed

    Scientist Leaderboard

    Name # of replies
    Multiverse skin is based on Greytness by Adammer